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Delicious Korean Street Food

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Every single time I watch a k-drama where the characters go for a walk to Hongdae or Myeong-dong, and they land up eating delicious food, the only thing I can think about is what they’re eating?

So, this time I decided to talk to you about one of the main topics that I am passionate about and is gaining popularity: delicious Korean street food.

Picture by NIcolas Groues from iStock

It all started in the Joseon dynasty when the street vendors sold food around the markets to the low-income population; later, during the Korean War (the mid-1950s), street food rise, serving mainly locals and even American soldiers, providing them with food at affordable prices.

Picture by chulmin1700 from Pixabay

In the beginning, the food sold in the street stalls was Jinppang (steamed bread stuffed with red beans) and Hoppang (steamed buns stuffed with vegetables or meat). But, little by little over the years, they have been joined by Tteokbokki, Kimbap, Chapssal-tteok, and other gastronomic delicacies.

Nowadays, street food is a mix between the traditional and the modern, a seasoning between national and international. Currently, there aren’t just street food stands but also food trucks and festivals related to street food. Where can find foods like the fish-shaped buns (Bungeoppang), those who appear in Vincenzo, or the fish cakes (Kkochi-eomuk) that Gu Jun Pyo of Boys Over Flowers eat; after going to the sauna with his father-in-law and brother-in-law.

Picture by 현경_윤 from iStock 

I know you’re wondering; what other foods are there?, so I’m going to give a quick mention (and hopefully in the future, we’ll delve into together) of some street foods that I haven’t mentioned on the blog so far. These include foods such as Hattogu, Hotteok, Gyeranppang, Dak-kkochi, and Gilgeori. Of course, there are also hamburgers, churros, tacos, and many other international foods, prepared either traditionally or in Korean style.

Picture by tragrpx from Pixabay

Finally, presently you can find street food in the districts of Jongno, Itaewon, Hongdae, Myeong-dong, and the Han River Park area, among other places. Now the next question is, which one will we try first? I have some ideas, but you tell me what you are craving. 

I’m Mar, and I’ll be waiting for you in the next post with another interesting food topic or recipe to try. Bye-bye.

References:

Korea Attrack. (s.f). Korean Street Food. https://www.koreattrack.com/korean-street-food.html

Visit Korea. (diciembre 2020). La mejor comida callejera en invierno en Corea. https://spanish.visitkorea.or.kr/spa/ATT/4_1_view.jsp?cid=2537065 

Wikipedia. (s.f). Street Food in Sout Korea. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_food_in_South_Korea#:~:text=Street%20food%20has%20become%20an,arise%20at%20the%20Joseon%20markets.

Written by: Marisol Montiel

Reviewed by: Laura Herrera

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